About Your Water

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You may have received an early notification from the Glendale Water & Power related to upcoming pipeline repair projects in your neighborhood. These projects are scheduled to begin the heavy construction activities a few months from now and prior to performing any shutoffs, GWP staff will ensure the response to the COVID-19 is over, in order to maintain an uninterrupted water supply for sanitary purposes.

Where Your Water Comes From

Glendale’s water supply comes from a diverse and resilient portfolio of sources, and GWP’s team is always working to keep the supply reliable and to operate the water system efficiently. The total amount of water needed every year depends on you.  Typically during warmer years customer demands go up and during cooler years they go down. So, GWP’s Water Facility Operators have to balance the supplies to meet the demands.

Groundwater is pumped from wells in the San Fernando Basin to supply about 25% of Glendale’s water. This supply is limited due to the Upper Los Angeles River Area (ULARA) judgment, and GWP maximizes the amount pumped from the San Fernando Basin by running it through the Glendale Water Treatment Plant (GWTP) to help clean-up the basin as part of an Environmental Protection Agency Superfund clean-up project called the Glendale Operable Unit. The GWTP has been in service for nearly 20 years. The GWTP extracts groundwater that has chemicals in it from the manufacturing industries that used to be in the San Fernando Valley, and cleans it up.

The treatment plant removes chemicals and metals using multiple treatment process including ion-exchange, air-stripping, and adsorption through a granular-activated carbon media. These processes along with disinfection, improves the water quality so that it meets or exceeds all State and Federal drinking water standards. Operation of the GWTP is funded by a group of industries that potentially caused the contamination which allows GWP to keep water rates low by enabling GWP to use Glendale’s water rights in the San Fernando Basin to produce local water and reduce the amount of purchased imported water needed, benefitting today’s residents and customers.

Groundwater is also pumped form the Verdugo Basin. Water pumped from these wells is treated by disinfection and then blended in one of two reservoirs with water from MWD. Due to declining groundwater levels in the basin, pumping is limited. To help get the benefit of water rights in this basin, GWP drilled the Rockhaven Well and is now leasing the well and the associated water rights to the Crescenta Valley Water District, which has a nitrate treatment plant that can treat the water from this well.

The City of Glendale is co-owner of the LA-Glendale Water Reclamation Plant. As co-owner, Glendale is entitled to 50% of the treated water produced by the plant. The demand from Glendale’s recycled water customers currently varies, mainly due to weather, and is between 1,600 and 2,000 ACFT per year, which is between 6% and 7% of the City’s total water demand. GWP has several projects planned to use an additional 400 ACFT per year of recycled water, and offset the amount of potable water needed to meet these demands.

Glendale’s main source of water is the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD). Glendale was one of the 13 founding Cities of MWD in 1928. As a Member Agency of MWD, Glendale is able to have a reliable supply of water from two different sources. The first source is the Colorado River Aqueduct, which is dependent on precipitation in the mountains and basins that feed the Colorado River. The second source is the State Water Project, which is dependent on precipitation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California. MWD has connected both sources into an integrated system to increase resiliency, and MWD has built multiple reservoirs and conveyance systems to move and store water within the region. MWD completed the Diamond Valley Lake in 1999 at a cost of $2 billion and the water stored in this reservoir helped reduce the impact of the Drought of 2015 to the residents of Glendale.

The water supplied by the State Water Project and the Colorado River Aqueduct is naturally desalinated using solar power as the sun warms the ocean and evaporates water into the atmosphere which falls as snow in the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the Rocky Mountains which then melts and flows into the two aqueducts. After collection and transportation, the MWD treats the water that Glendale uses at one of two regional surface water treatment plants, first disinfecting it with Ozone treatment, then coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation and filtration and finally with additional disinfection prior to delivery to Glendale.

So, with long range planning and day-to-day operational knowhow, GWP is always working to maintain an efficient and reliable water supply for the City of Glendale.


Keeping Glendale's Water Safe

Glendale Water & Power is committed to maintaining the safety of the City’s water supply.  The City purchases between 60% and 70% of its potable water from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and between 30% and 40% of its water is from local groundwater wells. Each source of water is highly treated to stringent state and federal water quality standards.  GWP’s staff take more than 5,700 water quality samples every year and they monitor the testing and compliance of over 2,200 backflow prevention assemblies that help ensure contamination doesn’t enter the water system.

Water Safety During COVID-19 and the Corona Virus

According the EPA, “The COVID-19 virus has not been detected in drinking-water supplies. Based on current evidence, the risk to water supplies is low. Americans can continue to use and drink water from their tap as usual.”

This statement is based on the fact that the treatment processes used by GWP at the City’s wells and by MWD at the surface water treatment plants that serve Glendale is disinfection using chlorine at the initial point of treatment and then the use of chloramines to maintain a long lasting disinfectant residual in the water distribution system in order to prevent water borne pathogens. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency, “Coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, is a type of virus that is particularly susceptible to disinfection and standard treatment and disinfectant processes are expected to be effective.”

To read more from the EPA you can click on this link:  https://www.epa.gov/coronavirus/coronavirus-and-drinking-water-and-wastewater

The California State Department of Water Resources, Division of Drinking Water, is the State Agency that regulates the safety of Glendale’s drinking water and they have posted fact sheets about water safety and COVID-19 in English and Spanish at the links below:

Fact Sheet on Safety of State Public Drinking Water - English
Fact Sheet on Safety of State Public Drinking Water - Spanish

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California has a dedicated web page about its response to the Corona Virus and their response to keep water safe at www.mwdh2o.com/DocSvcsPubs/COVID-19/index.html. The Metropolitan Water District has also prepared these useful fact sheets in English, Spanish and Chinese at the links below:

MWD COVID-19 FAQs (English)
MWD COVID-19 FAQs (Spanish)
MWD COVID-19 FAQs (Chinese)

For emergencies like earthquakes or evacuations due to fires, the Glendale Fire Department recommends keeping an emergency supply kit with enough water to last 72 hours for your family’s needs. Glendale Water & Power’s water professionals are working around the clock to keep Glendale’s water system working so you have safe drinking water available for drinking and sanitary purposes, and so you do not have to buy extra water for your emergency supplies during a pandemic related emergency like COVID-19.

The most regular source of information about water in Glendale is the “City of Glendale Water & Power, Water Quality Report to our Customers”. This report is also called the “Consumer Confidence Report” and it is updated annually. The report contains the actual results of the tests performed on the water system and this information is supplied to State Water Resources Control Board, Division of Drinking Water, the agency that regulates water quality throughout the state. You can download the reports at the links below which have the most recent information and many helpful questions and answers about your water as well as a thorough description of what each of the water quality terms in the report mean.

  

Water Quality Report / Consumer Confidence Report

Fluoride in Drinking Water

Water Hardness

Hexavalent Chromium Removal Research Project

 

PFAS in the News
Glendale Water & Power has been helping to clean-up the groundwater in the San Fernando Basin for almost 20 years as part of an EPA Superfund clean-up project called the Glendale Operable Unit. As part of the clean-up process a series of wells extract groundwater then send it to the Glendale Water Treatment Plant for clean-up to stringent drinking water standards. Various regulating agencies routinely ask GWP for assistance in monitoring remaining and new contaminants in the basin. Recently, the State Water Resources Control Board, Division of Drinking Water, requested that GWP perform additional sampling for PFAS in the wells used in the clean-up project prior to treatment. The treatment plant uses multiple technologies to clean-up the groundwater. One of the technologies is Granular Activated Carbon, or GAC for short, and this treatment technology removes PFAS and other contaminants. At the discharge from treatment plant, which is the point of compliance for drinking water standards and where the water enters the water system, PFOA and PFOS have not been detected. The Glendale Water Treatment Plant continues to be an important and successful project for maintaining and protecting Glendale’s local water supply.

The chemicals that Glendale is assisting the state in monitoring are PFOA and PFOS and so far here is what we’ve found:

 

 

PFOA (ng/L)

1stQuarter Test

2ndQuarter Test

3rdQuarter Test

4thQuarter Test

Sample Location

5/8/2019

9/18/2019

12/5/2019

2/6/2020

GS-1

23

21

23

22

GS-2

4.2

4.0

4.2

4.1

GS-3

ND

ND

ND

ND

GS-4

ND

ND

ND

ND

GS-5

2.4

ND

ND

ND

Glendale Water Treatment Plant

ND

ND

ND

ND

Grandview Blend*

ND

ND

ND

ND

 

 

PFOS (ng/L)

1stQuarter Test

2ndQuarter Test

3rdQuarter Test

4thQuarter Test

Sample Location

5/8/2019

9/18/2019

12/5/2019

2/6/2020

GS-1

33

25

31

25

GS-2

3.9

3.5

3.4

3.4

GS-3

ND

ND

ND

ND

GS-4

ND

ND

ND

ND

GS-5

ND

ND

ND

ND

Glendale Water Treatment Plant

ND

ND

ND

ND

Grandview Blend*

ND

ND

ND

ND

 
Notes:

PFOA - Perfluorooctanoic acid (NL: 5.1 ppt)
PFOS - Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (NL: 6.5 ppt)

* Compliance Point - Grandview Effluent where treatment plant water is blended and stored before being served as drinking water.

ng/L - (nanogram per liter which is equivalent to parts per trillion)
NL - Notification Level
ND - Not Detected

Click here to visit the EPA website and find out more about PFAS, and PFAS in the environment.

 


Requesting Changes To Your Water Service

Water Supply Information

Information on Fire Flow Availability for Building Permit

 


Water Conservation Resources

Water Saving Tips

How To Program Your Irrigation Controller

BeWaterWise.com

Water Rebates from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

GlendaleWaterWiseGardening.com

 


Water Rates

Click here to view GWP's Water Rates